Showing posts with label Tiger Woods. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Tiger Woods. Show all posts

Tuesday, May 11, 2010

Hank Haney Bails on the Tiger Woods Circus



Hank Haney
I hope that this is innocent and all--I don't relish the idea of Tiger Woods presiding over the fiasco of a career and a personal life. To me, the man needs to stop thinking he can get away with things because of the possibility that a lot of what he does will be excused because he's a "kid." Tiger Woods is not a kid, and now he's a golfer without a swing coach:
Tiger Woods’ longtime swing coach resigned Monday night, leaving the world’s No. 1 player without one of his top advisers as he tries to rebuild his game.
Hank Haney said in a statement to the Golf Channel that he enjoyed working with Woods but he thinks it’s time for him to step aside as his coach.
“I will always look back upon our past half-dozen years together as my best days in professional golf,” he said. “It would be a dream of any coach to have a student like Tiger Woods and for me it has come true. Just so there is no confusion I would like to make it clear that this is my decision."
Well, the speculation was correct, and Hank Haney probably doesn't have to worry about picking up clients. In fact, Hank has a pretty good deal going for himself. Here's what Hank put on his website last night:
I have informed Tiger Woods this evening that I will no longer be his coach.

I would like to thank Tiger for the opportunity that I have had to work with him over the past 6 plus years. Tiger Woods has done the work to achieve a level of greatness that I believe the game of golf has never seen before and I will always appreciate the opportunity that I have had to contribute to his successes. I have also enjoyed the association that I have had with Tiger both on and off the golf course as I have had some incredible experiences. 
But, what people who know golf can tell you, is that coaching is important, but mental preparedness is more important. Tiger can be the best-coached golfer in the world and still unravel like a cheap sweater when his head gets in the way. I really think there are physical issues here, and perhaps my speculation about pain killers was not as wildly off the mark as it could have been.

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Sunday, May 9, 2010

There Are Hard Days Ahead for Tiger Woods


I had made a rather rash and bold statement that could have come back to haunt me. I said that the reason why Phil Mickelson was welcoming a pairing with Tiger Woods stemmed from the fact that Tiger's best years are now well behind him and I really don't think Tiger presents the same problem for other golfers that he once did.
Tiger will certainly win some tournaments in the future. He will do well enough to surprise some people. But he's not the Tiger of the Tiger Slam years, nor is he as formidable as he once was. The young man has pissed all of that away, and his mental issues are unresolved. 
Lee Westwood wound up where he started in The Players Championship - with the lead. 

Only now he has a lot more company.
Westwood avoided mistakes on the back nine for a 2-under 70 that gave him a one-shot lead over Robert Allenby going into the final round on the always unpredictable TPC Sawgrass.
Phil Mickelson, nine shots behind at the start of the day, shot a 66 to renew hopes of winning and becoming No. 1 in the world for the first time. He was five shots behind. 

Mickelson would have to win and have Tiger Woods finish out of the top five, and Woods did his part. His bogey-bogey finish gave him a 71 and left him 10 shots behind in a tie for 45th.
Tied for 45th is not exactly where we are used to seeing Tiger. What I want to know is, is he fit? Is he feeling any pain in his knee? This is not something that should be ignored. We don't know if he's even a hundred percent, physically. There was a real danger of him missing the cut; expect more of that until things start to turn around for Tiger, assuming they will turn around for him. Only the rubes are making him the favorite in these tournaments. How does your smart money look now, gamblers?
There was a time when Lefty didn't have a single major win to call his own, and it looked like Tiger would rule golf for twenty years or more. Those days are over.
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Tuesday, December 15, 2009

When The Money Stops, the Hookers Do Tend to Give Up Your Secrets

Nah, Keep Digging, Sir...


Am I reading this wrong?



Despite claims that Tiger Woods was cheap when it came to spending money on the women with whom he had relationships, some did benefit financially and continue to do so.


According to several women who were involved with the golfer, Woods wired money to them on a monthly basis. The dollar amounts they cite range from $5,000 to $10,000 per month, and there’s talk among those women that someone out there might be getting as much as $20,000 per month.


“The money comes via a wire transfer,” said one woman. “There’s no contract about it, there’s no discussion about what it’s for, but it’s implied that it’s in exchange for keeping quiet about his affair.”


According to that same woman, Woods continued to be in touch in the days following his Thanksgiving night car accident. “Elin took his cell phone away, so he had to call from his land line at home,” said one. “He hasn’t called in at least a week though.”



Of course, Tiger gets all of that money back from his whores, now that they've gone on talk shows and all that, correct?


Oh, wait. There was no contract. So, unlike the huge losses that Tiger now has to suffer because Accenture, Gillette, and a growing number of advertisers have cancelled his contractstheir with him, Tiger doesn't get his whoring around money back from the flopsy butter hogs and the anal porn stars and the hillbilly trailer trash he was banging. And I say that as a man who has nothing against whores. I love whores. I'm not a former billionaire who made bank presenting myself as an elite athlete and an establishment darling, however. Has Jim Brown reached out to Tiger yet? Can't wait for that debacle.


That's how that works, right? Sometimes, I'm so naive about these things. I really need to do more whoring around.

Wednesday, December 2, 2009

Tiger angers Jesper Parnevik


Put this in the category of, "tell us how you really feel:"
In the most critical comment from a player, Jesper Parnevik said he owed Elin Nordegren an apology for introducing her to Tiger Woods. She once worked as a nanny for the Parnevik family.

“We probably thought he was a better guy than he is,” Parnevik told The Golf Channel from West Palm Beach, Fla., where he is in the final stage of PGA Tour qualifying.

Police said Woods’ wife told them she smashed out the back window of his Cadillac Escalade SUV with a golf club to help get him out after he struck a fire hydrant and tree early last Friday.

“I would probably need to apologize to her and hope she uses a driver next time instead of a 3-iron,” Parnevik said, adding that he has not spoken to Woods since the accident.

“It’s a private thing, of course,” the Swede said. “But when you are the guy he is — the world’s best athlete — you should think more before you do stuff ... and maybe not ‘Just do it,’ like Nike says.”

Notice how Parnevik goes directly at Tiger's money with that "Just do it" remark? That's some serious smack talking. Do you think that went too far? I don't. I think Parnevik has gotten some heat from his own people for putting the former Mrs. Nordegren in a world where she can now walk away with quite a bit of Tiger's money--what a terrible thing to do to a woman.

As for the mental aspect, and the intimidation aspect, as it relates to golf, do you think Tiger is now finished as far as being able to break other players down? Do you think Tiger isn't going to go out there next year and run like a scared titty baby from Parnevik? What backs up your skills as a golfer is certitude, and I don't know how much of that Tiger has left. I really don't.

I have to believe that Parnevik lives in Tiger's head now.

Saturday, November 28, 2009

What Happened Here?

The Buick Enclave, which was NOT the vehicle the Tiger Woods was driving when he crashed


Negligent, impaired, or just plain confused?



Tiger Woods was seriously injured early Friday when he hit a fire hydrant and a tree near his Florida home, authorities said.


The Florida Highway Patrol said the PGA star hit the fire hydrant and tree as he pulled out of his driveway in his 2009 Cadillac sport utility vehicle.


Mr. Woods was taken to Health Central Hospital. Officials there didn't have record of him as a patient, though the news release said Mr. Woods' injuries were serious.


The highway patrol said the crash is still under investigation, and charges are pending. However, the highway patrol said the crash was not alcohol-related.


Mr. Woods, 33 years old, owns a home in the exclusive subdivision of Isleworth near Orlando. Orange County property records indicate his home is valued at $2.4 million.



Woods was driving a Cadillac--and yet, he's the spokesperson for the Buick Enclave, pictured above. I would say that the pending charges are for negligent driving or driving while impaired in some way.

Pain killers? Is it wrong to suggest that Woods may have been under the influence of a pain killer of some type? Given his history of being injured, is that outside of the realm of possibility?

Sunday, November 22, 2009

Missing the Glory Days of Golf

Warwick Hills, 17th Hole


Tough times for the economy mean tough times for golf courses:



The recession has dealt a mean bogey to golf. Hundreds of courses have closed in the last two years and many formerly exclusive country clubs have slashed fees or opened their greens to the public.

Sales of golf balls, clubs and apparel -- a multibillion-dollar industry -- have dipped 10% this year as players trim spending, according to golf researcher Pellucid Corp.

But perhaps the most dramatic examples of golf's woes can be seen in the string of barren fairways and locked gates. Through September of this year, at least 114 of the nation's 16,000 or so golf courses had closed, according to the National Golf Foundation, a number that was offset only partly by the opening of 44 new courses.

"People are cutting golf out of their diets because they've got to cut something," said Jeff Woolson, a real estate broker with Los Angeles-based CB Richard Ellis who specializes in buying and selling golf courses.

Woolson and other real estate experts say most golf courses have lost 30% to 50% of their worth in the last two years. Several courses have been forced into bankruptcy. Among them is Chevy Chase Country Club in Glendale, which dates to 1925 and was designed by noted golf architect William P. Bell, who also designed the Bel Air Country Club and the Newport Beach Country Club.

The owners tried to sell it for $6.5 million, but couldn't find a buyer before the bankruptcy court decided to turn it over to the lender. The asking price, which would have included a Spanish-style clubhouse and Olympic-sized pool on 35 acres, might sound like a bargain -- there are homes in the Los Angeles area that sell for more -- but golf courses are businesses, not typical real estate investments, because they must remain golf courses. And business has been bad lately.

It's a big comedown from the glory days.

Golf thrived so in the 1980s that it was widely believed that a new U.S. course could open every day and there still wouldn't be enough links to satisfy demand. In the 1990s came Tiger Woods, who made the world pay attention to golf as he grew to dominate the sport. The "Tiger effect," many investors assumed, would launch a youth wave of interest in the sport.



The Tiger effect really didn't happen. Just because a lot of people began to pay attention to golf, that didn't necessarily translate into people taking up the sport. I'm sure that a few tried it, but rarely did you see anyone stick with the sport once they figured out just how difficult it was.


The glory days happened because people had money and leisure time. Working for the Man nowadays means no time off, screaming brats on the weekend, and barely enough money to not pay the mortgage. The increase in the number of people wearing nametags and working for peanuts has meant that there are fewer and fewer bankers and financial services people to play golf.

Saturday, November 14, 2009

Golf and a Man Bear Pig

Sign, Camp Bonifas, South Korea


Here's a story about our troops that doesn't involve horrible news and tragedy. This is exactly the sort of thing I enjoy reading about, and learning about. I'm afraid I can't do horror and screaming and what the hell is our government doing? posts all of the time. Most of the time, sure. I have brass balls in that regard. But, once in a while, I have to get off that bus and stretch my legs.


In South Korea, our troops have many, many golf courses. One, in particular, stands out:



You stand atop an elevated tee box on the first and only hole of the world's most dangerous golf course.

And you consider your chances.

This deadly little par 3 measures 192 yards but plays more like 250 in the face of the vicious winds that often blow out of North Korea across an exclusive piece of real estate called the DMZ just a few yards away.

Underneath your feet and off to the right are bunkers. The military kind. To the left, over an 18-foot-high security fence topped by concertina wire, are hazards that make high rough, deep water and dense woods seem like child's play.

Try countless unexploded mines -- the very definition of out-of-bounds. One herky-jerky backswing, one snap hook yanked out of your bag at the wrong moment and . . . ba-boom!



The soldiers would like Tiger Woods to play the course, and there's no reason why he shouldn't. It would be a great Public Relations move. I've seen some nutty things on the golf course, but this is a bit much:



Over the years, the course has developed its own mystique. Play alone here and you'll see. Weird things happen.


"You see animals," [Army Sgt. Mikel] Thurman says.

Like wild boars, Korean tigers and so-called vampire deer.

And even something weirder.

"Some guys say they've seen this thing, a man-bear-pig," Thurman says without smiling. "That's what they say."



Well, there is no man-bear-pig. There are men who don't shave, and there are men with pig faces, but unless someone has been dabbling in the realm of cloning and dogs and...and...



Research by South Korea's top human cloning scientist  [he announced in August, 2005 that his team had created the world's first cloned dog]- hailed as a breakthrough earlier this year - was fabricated, colleagues have concluded.


A Seoul National University panel said the research by world-renowned Hwang Woo-suk was "intentionally fabricated", and he would be disciplined.


Dr Hwang said he would resign, but he did not admit his research was faked.


"I sincerely apologise to the people for creating shock and disappointment," he said after the panel's announcement.


"As a symbol of apology, I step down as professor of Seoul National University."




Never mind.

Friday, October 9, 2009

Golf and Rugby Get Their Shot at the Olympics



I don't see how golf could become an Olympic sport, nor do I think rugby has enough universal appeal to make it, either:
One more reason to buy a ticket to Rio in 2016? Tiger Woods.

Rugby can start to scrum and golf can tee up after both sports were officially admitted to the 2016 Olympic program on Friday in a majority vote of the IOC membership in Copenhagen.

Golf won admission by a vote of 63-27 with one abstention. Rugby passed with a more decisive 81-8, with two abstentions. The two sports were put up to a vote after the IOC's 15-member executive committee had nominated them in August for addition to the program from a list that included squash, karate, roller sports and the re-inclusion of baseball and softball.

With the addition of golf, the Olympics, which opened its doors to the likes of Michael Jordan, Wayne Gretzky and Roger Federer by liberalizing eligibility rules in recent years, will likely include Woods when the Games open in Rio seven years from now.

While rugby received strong backing across the IOC, there was some concern this week that golf would have more trouble. Golf received the fewest votes of the candidate sports when it applied for addition to the 2012 program four years ago. As rugby agreed to abandon its prestigious world cup during Olympic years, some members expressed reservations about adding golf on the theory that athletes would consider Olympic medals less prestigious than other events such as the Masters or British Open.

But the possible addition of Woods is huge gain for the Olympics. Despite the Olympics claims to champion amateurism, professional star power rules and the addition of recognized international sporting figures could encourage television networks and sponsors to spend more money on the Games.

How far will star power get you?

Golf is too much of an individual sport that cannot be measured in Olympic terms--i.e., with a clock or with a final score that decisively tells you who is best. The Olympics are about a person who trains for years to be able to shave a tenth of a second off of a killer exertion against others equally dedicated. Golf is a tremendous sport, but one day of swinging poorly and you're done. Team sports fare better, but that team sport has to have had a tradition of being played. Water polo may make you giggle, but it has more Olympic cachet than rugby ever will. Rugby could catch on, but who knows? That it wasn't already an Olympic sport tells you something.

Golf is really about consistency over an entire tour. That's sort of why we play it that way, as a season, where a golfer has weeks of being down followed by a brilliant set of rounds at a particular course. Condensing a golf tour into an Olympics stand is like a skins game--did the best player win, or did the player who was on the uptick win? What if Tiger goes to the Olympics and is out early due to a poor series of rounds? Does that mean he really isn't the best golfer there?

Wednesday, August 12, 2009

Sorry, Golf is a Money Sport, not an Amateur Sport


-the 2002 US Open-

Golf, being the game of monetary purses and prizes, with the occasional team play thrown in, wouldn't work in the Olympics. I'm shocked that it is even being bandied about:
If golf becomes an Olympic sport on Thursday, then we would finally get to see all the best golfers in the world, as they would come together and play a special, important event.

How many lies did I tell in that sentence?

1) We already see all the best come together. In fact, 98 of the top 100 ranked golfers are in the field here, at the PGA Championship this week. 2) Most of the top players wouldn't go to the Olympics, and the field would be weak and entirely unbalanced. 3) It would not be a special event.

And that doesn't even count the one about golf being a sport.

Golf should not be in the Olympics. But on Thursday, an IOC committee is expected to announce which two sports it plans to recommend for the 2016 Olympics, leaving only a rubber-stamp vote by the full IOC in October to make it official.

Golf is expected to be selected.

"Golf is a truly global sport and I think it should have been in the Olympics a while ago," Tiger Woods said. "If it does get in, I think it would be great for golf, and especially some of the other smaller countries that are now emerging in golf."

To be certain, yes there are amateur golf events. Virtually all of our universities and colleges that haven't been forced to cut golf as a sport offer it, sometimes even with a scholarship, Title IX notwithstanding.

Golf is really the sport of the professional, not the amateur. With monetary prizes being the usual outcome, rather than mere championships, golf is separate from the amateur sports in that winning is fine, but winning for money is really the impetus for men and women to compete on grueling tours all throughout the world.

The closest analogy I can think of is horse racing. You don't see horse racing as an Olympic sport because of the cost of the horse. The golfer is like the horse--he is fickle, picky about where he sleeps, who he plays with, and where he plays. The Olympics would be something to skip in lieu of a possible win against an Olympic-depleted field in a tournament held during any Olympics.

So, no. It sounds egalitarian. It really isn't a great idea.

Sunday, August 2, 2009

Tiger is Back



This should shut a few people up, at least for the duration of this evening. They'll be back carping about him bright and early tomorrow morning:
Tiger Woods won the Buick Open for a third time and claimed his 69th PGA Tour victory...[he] shot a 3-under 69 and coasted to a three-shot victory with a 20-under 268 total at Warwick Hills, which hosted its first Buick Open in 1958 and seemed to stage its final one Sunday.

"I've played all around the world, and I've never seen a day like this," said Woods, also the 2002 and 2006 winner at Warwick Hills. "This event has always been special, but today was something else."

He acknowledged thinking about his walk up 18 at Warwick Hills being his last, leading to him throwing his ball with a lot of velocity back down the fairway to fans. He also tossed a ball into the gallery at 17.

"I never do that, but today was different," Woods said. "We aren't coming back here, and I wanted to thank all these people."

Cue the haters, the naysayers, and the just plain ridiculous commentators. Tiger's win on what is, admittedly, a relatively easy course to play is a step in the right direction. Correcting a dismal short game shows that he has the mental control he needs to get a few more victories under his belt this season, and he has one shot at a major left in him, when Hazeltine and the PGA.